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PART THREE: THE MUSIC COMPOSITIONS: “Celebrating Time” (Kay Thompson). Performed by Kay Thompson on It’s Chesterfield Time (CBS-Radio, 4/30/1937). “What More Can I Give You?” (Kay Thompson-Jack Jenney). Recorded 4/11/1939 by Jack Jenney & His Orchestra (Vocalion 4803). “51 East 51” (Kay Thompson). Performed by Kay Thompson on Forecast: “51 East 51” (CBS-Radio, 7/21/1941). “More Wonderful Than These” (Kay Thompson-William Spier). Copyright: September 24, 1940. Performed by Kay Thompson on Kay Thompson Festival aka Kay Thompson and Company (CBS-Radio 1941-42). Also performed by James Mason in Lady Possessed  (Republic, 1952). “If I Fell and Broke My Heart” (Kay Thompson-Judy Garland). Songwriting collaboration reported by columnist Louella Parsons in September 1943. No recordings or sheet music have ever surfaced. “She’s My Target for Tonight” (Kay Thompson). Comic composition written for Virginia O’Brien to perform in unspecified M-G-M movie, sold to the studio in the fall of 1943, but no recordings or sheet music have ever surfaced. “Sylvia Having Her Tonsils Out” (Kay Thompson) When Kay Thompson and her second husband Bill Spier were residing at the Garden of Allah (1943-44), one of their neighbors was a little girl named Sylvia, daughter of screenwriter Arthur Sheekman and actress Gloria Stuart of Titanic fame. Sylvia recalled, “When I had my tonsils out, Kay actually made a record, a song she wrote for me called ‘Sylvia Having Her Tonsils Out.’ It was so incredible . . . a 78 disc, one-sided. The fact that anyone would do this during the war for a little girl having her tonsils out was amazing. All I remember is it started with distant calling, ‘Sylvia . . . ? Sylvia . . . ? ’ as if I were coming out of the anesthetic. Can you imagine doing that for a child?” Unfortunately, Sylvia lost the record and it appears to have been one-of-a-kind. “Roger de Coverley” (Kay Thompson-Ralph Blane) For Roger Edens’ birthday, November 9, 1944, Thompson and Blane composed a song called “Roger de Coverley,” Kay’s nickname for Roger Edens. It was a reference to Sir Roger de Coverley, an eighteenth-century columnist for the British newspaper The Spectator, but historical significance was hardly the point. Kay just liked the way the name rolled off her tongue. “Holiday Season” (Kay Thompson) and “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” (traditional 1857 James Lord Pierpont carol, with special arrangement, music and lyrics by Kay Thompson). Performed by Kay Thompson at the Hollywood Bowl, 12/22/1945, and on Request Performance (CBS-Radio, 12/23/1945). “Vive l’Amour” (Kay Thompson-Ralph Blane-George Stoll). Performed by Lauritz Melchior in Thrill of a Romance (M-G-M, 1945). “A Great Lady Has an Interview” aka “Madame Crematante” (Kay Thompson-Roger Edens). Performed by Judy Garland in Ziegfeld Follies (M-G-M, 1946). Performed by Lana Turner on Ed Sullivan’s Toast of the Town (CBS-TV, 2/14/1954). Performed by Ann Miller on Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall (NBC-TV, 11/8/1958). “Love on a Greyhound Bus” (Kay Thompson-Ralph Blane-George Stoll), “Isn’t It Wonderful” (Kay Thompson), “Listen to Me” (Kay Thompson), and “Old Sad Eyes” (Sammy Fain-Irving Kahal, with revised lyrics by Kay Thompson). All four songs were performed by Pat Kirkwood for No Leave, No Love (M-G-M, 1946) – although the last two, “Listen to Me” and “Old Sad Eyes, were ultimately discarded. Many artists subsequently recorded cover versions of “Love on a Greyhound Bus” and it was used as a jingle for Greyhound Bus radio commercials. “Beautee Soap Jingles” (Kay Thompson) for The Hucksters (M-G-M, 1947). Several faux radio commercial jingles for fictional Beautee Soap, performed by Kay Thompson and her chorus. Nightclub numbers: Thompson composed at least 26 songs for her various nightclub acts, 1947-1955. The following 12 have survived because they were either recorded or performed on radio and/or television: 1. “Hello, Hello” (Kay Thompson). Later covered by Liza Minnelli (on Broadway in Liza’s at the Palace, 2008) 2. “Jubilee” aka “Jubliee Time” (Kay Thompson). Later covered by Andy Williams (on The Muppet Show, 3/20/1980) and Liza Minnelli (on Broadway in Liza’s at the Palace, 2008) 3. “Poor Suzette” (Kay Thompson-Robert Alton) 4. “Myrtle (of Sheepshead Bay)” (Kay Thompson-Robert Alton). 5. “(The Birds Are Talkin’) ‘Bout You ‘n’ Me” (Kay Thompson). Later covered by Andy Williams during his solo nightclub debut at New York’s Blue Angel in November 1949. Also, the song was performed as a duet by Kay Thompson and Frank Sinatra on The Frank Sinatra Show (CBS-TV, 10/28/1950). 6. “On the Caribbean” (Kay Thompson-Robert Alton). 7. “Old-Fashioned Hammock” (Kay Thompson). 8. “Don’t Tell Louella” (Kay Thompson-Robert Alton). 9. “Quel Joie” (Kay Thompson). 10. “Katie’s Blues” (Kay Thompson). 11. “Light Up the Candles on the Birthday Cake” (Kay Thompson-Robert Alton). 12. “Oh! What a Cup of Tea” aka “This Reminds Me of London” (Kay Thompson). No recordings or sheet music have surfaced of these additional 14 compositions performed in Thompson’s nightclub acts: 1. “Broadway, Street of Dreams” (Kay Thompson). 2. “Sloppy Joe’s” (Kay Thompson). 3. “Sweet William” (Kay Thompson). 4. “Show Business” (Kay Thompson). 5. “Relax, Heavenly Days” (Kay Thompson). 6. “Hollywood Party” (Kay Thompson-Robert Alton). 7. “Rubyocco from Morocco” (Kay Thompson). 8. “The Lives and Loves of Madelaine d’Esprit” (Kay Thompson). 9. “Circus” (Kay Thompson). 10. “Let’s All Go for a Walk” (Kay Thompson). 11. “Gotta Rejoice” (Kay Thompson). 12. “Get Away From Me, Boys, You Bother Me” (Kay Thompson). 13. “Virginia Happenstance” (Kay Thompson). 14. “Mad About the Ballet” (Kay Thompson). “Kay Thompson’s 23rd Psalm (The Lord is My Shepherd)” Composed in 1948, intended for Andy Williams and a children’s choir, though never recorded. Andy Williams sang it at the 2003 funeral of his eldest brother, Bob, and at the 2005 funeral of Emily Lennon Miller, the mother of the Lennon Sisters. “Lucky Day” (Kay Thompson). Performed by Graham Payn in The Lyric Revue (Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, London, England), 1951-52. “Kiss The Girls Goodbye” (Kay Thompson). Performed by Graham Payn in The Globe Revue  (Globe Theatre, West End, London, England), 1952-54. “It’s Good to Be Home Again” (Kay Thompson-Roger Edens). Performed by Van Johnson as the opening number to his Las Vegas nightclub act at The Sands Hotel, 4/1953. “What is Entertainment?” (Roger Edens-Kay Thompson) Composed in September 1953 for the proposed Judy Holliday-Peter Lawford nightclub act that Kay and Roger were co-creating. Unfortunately, the show never got off the ground and the song has never surfaced. “I Love a Violin” aka “Violins” or “(I Love a) Violin” (Kay Thompson). Recorded for 1954 album Kay Thompson Sings (M-G-M E-3146). From 1947 to 1969, Thompson performed the song in her various nightclub acts and on numerous television shows. Subsequently covered by many artists including Petula Clark, Teresa Brewer, Dinah Shore, Dorothy Collins, Timothy Gray, Michael Feinstein, and Liza Minnelli. “Bazazz” (Kay Thompson-Ralph Blane). Recorded 4/10/1957 by Kay Thompson (Verve V-10052). Performed by Thompson on The Ed Sullivan Show (CBS-TV, 4/14/1957). “I’m in Love with Paris” (Kay Thompson-Buster Davis). Performed by Jane Powell on The Standard Oil 75th Anniversary Show (NBC-TV, 10/13/1957). “You Gotta Love Everybody” (Kay Thompson-Bill Norvas). Recorded by Danny Kaye (Capitol Records, recorded in 1956, unreleased). Performed by Danny Kaye on The Danny Kaye Show  (CBS-TV, 2/8/1966). Also recorded by: Della Reese (Jubilee Records 5332, released in 1958); Ray Ellington (Pye Nixa Records 15159, released in the UK in 1958); and The Sun Spots (Magnet Records LP-100, released 1964).    In the spring of 1957, when the Broadway musical Happy Hunting (1956-57) failed to win any Tony Awards, producer-and-star Ethel Merman replaced two of her songs in the show with new songs composed by Kay Thompson and Roger Edens: “Just a Moment Ago” and “I’m Old Enough To Know Better and Young Enough Not To Care. Because Edens was exclusive to M-G-M, Kay received sole songwriting credit. According to cast member George Martin, during the Philadelphia tryout, Kay composed a new opening number, “Gee, But It’s Great To Be Here, that was used throughout the Broadway run – but, for contractual reasons, the musical’s composers, Matt Dubey and Harold Karr, received credit. Kay recorded two Eloise songs: “Eloise” (Kay Thompson-Robert Wells), and “It’s Absolutely Christmastime” (Kay Thompson). She also wrote several Eloise songs in sheet music form for her Eloise books, including “Oh, What a Lov-a-ly Mawning,” “Eloise in Paris,” “It’s Christmas Everywhere, and “Eloise Takes a Bawth. Thompson composed three new songs for the Playhouse 90 presentation of Eloise” (CBS-TV, 11/22/1956): “3:00 A.M. in the Persian Room,” “Johanna,” and “What Is the Proper Way to Raise a Child?” The previous hit song, “Eloise” (Kay Thompson-Robert Wells), was also performed in the program. And, “Oh, What a Lov-a-ly Mawning” (Kay Thompson), taken from her book, Eloise, was performed as well. “Moscow Cha Cha Cha” (Kay Thompson-Dick Grossman) and “Dasvidanya (Until We Meet Again)” (Kay Thompson-Dick Grossman). Recorded by Kay Thompson, 8/1959 (Hanover-Signature 12,008). “Follow Me” (Kay Thompson). Recorded by Johnny Mathis with orchestra conducted by Glenn Osser. From the Johnny Mathis album Faithfully, Columbia Records (CS 8219), 33 rpm 12-inch vinyl, recorded 11/1959; released 12/1959; peaked on Billboard album chart at No. 2 on 1/18/1960. “Subito” (Kay Thompson). Recorded by Steve Rossi with orchestra conducted by Glenn Osser. Columbia Records (4-41698), 45 rpm single, released 6/1960. “Charades” (Kay Thompson). Performed by Kay Thompson on Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall (NBC- TV, 12/28/1960). Additionally, Thompson composed 10 songs that Andy Williams recorded from 1954-1963 (in chronological order): 1. “Ground Hog” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Copyright registered by Kay Thompson on February 12, 1954. Published by Colgems EMI Music Inc. Recorded for RCA’s Label X in April 1954.  Orchestra conducted by Gary Heller. Never released but is preserved in RCA’s vault. 2. “(There Is a Time) A-O-Lee-O” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Registered with ASCAP under the erroneous title “This Is the Time” by Kay Thompson. Recorded for RCA’s Label X in April 1954. Orchestra conducted by Gary Heller. The song was shelved but later surfaced in 1971 on the album Andy Williams (RCA Camden Records, CAS-2525e) and reissued in 1977 on the album Andy Williams (Pickwick International, ACL 7036). The indie British rock band Vatican Jet recorded a cover version of “(There Is a Time) A-O-Lee-O” in 2006 (hear it at: www.myspace.com/vaticanjet). 3. “Stop Teasin' Me” (words and music by Y. des Louvettes, pseudonym for Kay Thompson). Published by Barnaby Music, Inc. (Andy Williams’ publishing company). Registered with ASCAP under songs composed by Kay Thompson. Recorded for Cadence Records in early 1957. Orchestra conducted by Archie Bleyer. In April 1957, “Stop Teasin’ Me” was released as the B-side of “I Like Your Kind Of Love” (Cadence 1323), which peaked at No. 8 on the Billboard pop singles chart in May 1957. In 1958, “Stop Teasin' Me” was included in the album Andy Williams (Cadence Records, CLP- 3002). 4. “Straight From My Heart” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Published by Kay Thompson Music, Inc. – ASCAP. Recorded for Cadence Records in the summer of 1957. Orchestra conducted by Archie Bleyer. In August 1957, “Straight From My Heart” was released as the B-side of “Lips Of Wine” (Cadence 1336), which peaked at No. 17 in September 1957. In 1958, “Straight From My Heart” was included in the album Andy Williams (Cadence Records, CLP-3002). 5. “Promise Me Love” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Published by Kay Thompson Music, Inc. – ASCAP. Recorded for Cadence Records on August 1, 1958. Orchestra conducted by Archie Bleyer. In August 1958, “Promise Me Love” was released as an A-side single (Cadence 1351) which peaked at No. 17 in September 1958. Oddly, this Top 20 hit was not included on an Andy Williams album until years later. On Chevy’s Summer Showroom Starring Andy Williams (ABC-TV, 8/21/1958), Andy Williams and his brother, Dick Williams, performed “Promise Me, Love” as a duet. 6. “Summer Love” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Published by Kay Thompson Music, Inc. – ASCAP. Recorded for Cadence Records on August 23, 1959. Orchestra conducted by Archie Bleyer.  In August 1959, “Summer Love” was released as the B-side of “Lonely Street” (Cadence 1370), which peaked at No. 5 in September 1959. In December 1959, “Summer Love” was included in the album Lonely Street (Cadence Records, CLP-3030/CLP-25030) which peaked on the pop album chart at No. 38 in January 1960. 7. “Sweet Morning” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Published by Kay Thompson Music, Inc. – ASCAP. Recorded at Webster Hall, New York, for Cadence Records in early January 1960. Orchestra conducted by Archie Bleyer. In March 1960, “Sweet Morning” was included in the album Village Of St. Bernadette (Cadence Records, CLP-3038/CLP-25038). 8. “Au Revoir Paris” (words and music by Kay Thompson). Published by Kay Thompson Music, Inc. – ASCAP. Recorded at the Barclay Studios in Paris for Cadence Records in June 1960. Orchestra conducted by Quincy Jones (featuring pianist Dave Grusin). In November 1960, “Au Revoir Paris” was included in Andy Williams’ album Under Paris Skies (Cadence Records, CLP-3047/CLP-25047). In November 1973, “Au Revoir, Paris” was pre-recorded by Liza Minnelli, with piano accompaniment by Kay Thompson and accordion by Max Hamlisch (father of Marvin), for Le Grand Divertissement à Versailles, the fashion extravaganza staged by Thompson at the Palace of Versailles on 11/28/1973. 9. Medley: “Holiday Season” (words and music by Kay Thompson) / “Happy Holiday” (Irving Berlin, from the movie Holiday Inn), arranged by Marty Paich for Andy Williams in 1963. Recorded by Andy Williams for Columbia Records in the fall of 1963. Arranged and conducted by Robert Mersey. Piano: Dave Grusin. In December 1963, the “Holiday Season” / “Happy Holiday” medley was included in The Andy Williams Christmas Album (Columbia Records, CS 8887) which peaked at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Holiday Album Chart in December 1963. “Holiday Season” was first performed by Kay Thompson and her Rhythm Singers on Request Performance (CBS-Radio, December 23, 1945). Thompson finally got around to copyrighting the song on March 31, 1955.   10. “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” (traditional 1857 standard by James Lord Pierpont; 1945 arrangement and new words by Kay Thompson; Thompson’s version adapted for Andy Williams in 1963 by arranger Robert Mersey). Recorded by Andy Williams for Columbia Records in the fall of 1963. Arranged and conducted by Robert Mersey. Piano: Dave Grusin. In December 1963, “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” by Andy Williams was released as the B-side of “White Christmas” (Columbia Records), which peaked at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Holiday Singles Chart in December 1963. In December 1963, “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” was included in The Andy Williams Christmas Album (Columbia Records, CS 8887) which peaked at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Holiday Album Chart in December 1963. “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” was first performed by Kay Thompson and her Rhythm Singers on Request Performance (CBS-Radio, December 23, 1945). After Andy Williams turned it into a holiday standard in 1963, the song has been covered by Liza Minnelli (in concert), Trisha Yearwood (in the 2010 PBS special Christmas at Belmont), Manhattan Transfer, Acoustix, Michael W. Smith, The Osmond Brothers, Marie Osmond, The Osmond Boys, among others. The Rockettes have danced to it during their Christmas show at Radio City Music Hall. Andy Williams has also re-recorded the song on a number of occasions for later Christmas albums. “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” was also featured in director Garry Marshall’s all-star movie New Year’s Eve (Warner Brothers, 2011), performed on the soundtrack by Brian Hertz and John Redsecker. Sheet music—but no known recordings—has surfaced for these three rare Kay Thompson compositions (courtesy of Michael Feinstein): 1. “Jeanie” (Kay Thompson). Sheet music states “Copyright © 1959, Kay Thompson Music, Inc.” However, copyright registration was made official on November 30, 1960. 2. “Miss Me” (Kay Thompson). Sheet music states “Copyright © 1959, Kay Thompson Music, Inc.” However, copyright registration was made official on November 30, 1960. 3. “Some Other Time” (Kay Thompson). Sheet music states “Copyright © 1960, Kay Thompson Music, Inc.” Copyright registration was made official on February 15, 1960. And, finally, there are four mystery Kay Thompson compositions for which neither recordings nor sheet music have yet surfaced: 1. “The Matchmaker” (Kay Thompson). Copyright registration on June 17, 1958. 2. “Di mi t’amo” (music by Kay Thompson; lyrics by Kay Thompson and H. Muni). Copyright registration on May 18, 1961. 3. “Flirtation” (Kay Thompson). Registered with ASCAP. 4. “On a Summer Evening” (Kay Thompson). Registered with ASCAP.
Kayographies
Think Pink! Think Pink! Think Pink! Part One: Headlining Part Two: Behind the Scenes Part Three: The Music Part Four: The Books
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